“Drugs of abuse hijack a mesolimbic pathway that processes homeostatic need” published in Science

“Drugs of abuse hijack a mesolimbic pathway that processes homeostatic need” published in Science

News
We are excited to share that our paper entitled "Drugs of abuse hijack a mesolimbic pathway that processes homeostatic need" has been published in Science.Drugs of abuse produce pleasurable feelings and reinforce consummatory behavior directed toward their acquisition. These same properties are characteristic of natural rewards that satisfy innate needs, such as food or water. Decades of research has shown that brain systems processing natural rewards are also impacted by drugs of abuse at the physiological, circuit, cellular, and molecular levels. These findings raise the hypothesis that drugs of abuse cause addiction by “hijacking” a common reward pathway, ultimately promoting drug intake while curbing other healthy goals. However, the specific neural substrates for such a shared reward pathway remain unidentified.In this paper we identified the nucleus accumbens (NAc) as a…
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Unbounded scaling of dimensionality with neuron number

Optical Neurotechnology
Our paper entitled “Simultaneous, cortex-wide and cellular-resolution neuronal population dynamics reveal an unbounded scaling of dimensionality with neuron number” has been published in Neuron. The brain’s remarkable properties arise from collective activity of millions of neurons. Widespread application of dimensionality reduction to multi-neuron recordings implies that neural dynamics can be approximated by low-dimensional “latent” signals reflecting neural computations. However, what would be the biological utility of such a redundant and metabolically costly encoding scheme and what is the appropriate resolution and scale of neural recording to understand brain function? Imaging the activity of one million neurons at cellular resolution and near-simultaneously across mouse cortex, we demonstrate an unbounded scaling of dimensionality with neuron number. While half of the neural variance lies within sixteen behavior-related dimensions, we find this unbounded scaling…
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